Science experiments to try at home

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Science experiments to try at home

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Does your child hate studying science? Do they have a problem with learning new Science chapters? If your answer is yes to either one or both of these questions, then you can consider letting your child try out some science experiments to supplement their learning.

When your child does the hands-on activity, they tend to remember the concept better and when they do their revision for that specific chapter, they can link the topic’s concept to the experiment they have conducted.

Conducting experiments also allow your child to increase their curiosity and they will be interested to find out more. When they find out more information on their own, they will tend to remember the information better rather than being spoon-fed via the textbook or during classes.

Of course, Science experiments do not need necessarily require a lot of equipment, here are some science experiments you and your child can do at home!

Interaction of forces

To have your child learn more about forces, you can try this experiment. You will need

  • Paperclips
  • Small stick
  • String
  • 3 small circle magnets
  • Metal ruler
  • Small stackable blocks

You will need to paste the magnets onto the metal ruler and then attach the ruler to the blocks. You also need to tie the paper clips onto the strings. Refer to the photo below on how the experiment looks like!

sci experiment magnet
pic from buggyand buddy.com

For more information and explanation, you can check out: https://buggyandbuddy.com/gravity/

Water cycle

To have your child learn more about the water cycle, you can try this experiment. You will need:

  • A ziplock plastic bag
  • Colour markers (e.g. Sharpie Permanent Markers or any non-erasable markers)
  • Water
  • Blue food colouring (optional)
  • Packing tape

Draw the water cycle diagram onto the ziplock bag. Warm up the water until steam starts to rise but do not let it boil. Add blue food colouring into the water to represent ocean water. Pour the water into a ziplock bag and zip it up.

Hang the bag upright on the window (or the door) using packing tape. Refer to the photo below for the ziplock bag drawing!

pic from rookieparenting.com
pic from rookieparenting.com

For more information and explanation, you can check out: https://www.rookieparenting.com/what-is-water-cycle/

Friction

To have your child learn more about friction, you can try this experiment. You will need:

  • CD
  • Unused balloon
  • Some sort of bottle cap that has an open/close mechanism
  • Packing tape
  • Scissors

Using packing tape, securely tape the bottle cap onto the CD. When you tug on the cap gently, there should not be a gap between the cap and the CD. Close the cap's opening. Blow up the balloon and hold its opening with one hand.

With the other hand, wrap the balloon's over the cap's opening and then let go. Place the hovercraft on a flat surface. When you're ready, push the cap open so the balloon can deflate through underneath the CD's hole.

pic from rookieparenting.com
pic from rookieparenting.com

For more information and explanation, you can check out: https://www.rookieparenting.com/hovercraft-friction-experiment/

Electrical system

This experiment also finds out if water can conduct electricity. To have your child learn more about electrical systems and how to build a simple circuit, you can try this experiment. You will need:

  • Small LED light bulb
  • 2 small button batteries
  • Copper wires or electrical wires with alligator clips
  • Scotch tape
  • Tap water
  • Distilled water (you can use bottled ones or make your own distilled water)
  • Small container

Fill the small container with tap water. Using the electrical wires, connect the LED light and batteries to build an open simple circuit (a circuit with an open-end). Dip the two open ends into the water. Repeat the same process with distilled water.

For more information and explanation, you can check out: https://www.rookieparenting.com/can-water-conduct-electricity-controlled-experiment/ 

We hope these science experiments will make your child more interested in science and helps in their retention of concepts. 

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